Dress-and act-the part

” Shakespeare was spot on when he said All the world’s a stage. We perform our identities every day, beginning with what we choose to wear in the morning in order to project our image to the public and ending with what we take off once we are back in the security of our own homes.”

Shakespeare was spot on when he said All the world’s a stage.

We perform our identities every day, beginning with what we choose to wear in the morning in order to project our image to the public and ending with what we take off once we are back in the security of our own homes.

The reason why fashion is so magical, so crucial to our everyday lives, is because it gives each and every one of us the ability to transform ourselves into whomever we want to be. What we wear day to day is more than just pieces of fabric, it is our costumes, our disguises.

And, because we can change what we wear-our costumes-that means we can change our identities so that, in a lifetime, we will have played hundreds, maybe even thousands, of different roles.

This philosophy is particularly pertinent to anyone who has job interviews lined up in the near future. If through fashion one can become anyone one wants to be, that means that, by dressing a certain way, one can become the specific person the interviewer is looking for.

But what about confidence, I’m sure you many of you are asking yourselves right now. As ridiculous as it sounds, confidence is a myth, a ruse of Big Foot proportions. Just like identity, confidence is also a performance, an act that even the most insecure of people can fake with the aid of clothes, speech, and posture.

First impressions are everything, and nothing factors more into an interviewer’s first impression of an applicant than the outfit one wears. An applicant’s attire is the first aspect an interviewer judges on, so choosing the perfect outfit is crucial. ?

When dressing for a job interview, it is always important to remember classic and conservative are both universal and timeless. That means tailored, crisp, and non-fussy button-downs, slacks (or pencil skirts), and blazers.

As for colors, it is always best to embrace neutrals-black, gray, white, navy, khaki and nude are always clean and sophisticated-and steer clear of bold, daring brights or prints, which may prove to be extremely daunting to pull off.

The key is to look stylish and professional but not over-dressed. In other words, don’t wear a three piece suit and tie unless you are interviewing at the White House.

Also, be sure to keep the location of where you are interviewing in mind. The more distinguished the position and company, the more one should up the ante to look as groomed and pristine as possible.

While dressing as polished and urbane as is essential to making a lasting impact, the manner in which one wears the clothes is just as, if not even more critical. Fashion is not all about clothes, but also about attitude and personality. The way in which we carry ourselves-our body language and our speech-bring the garments we choose to wear to life.

To revert back to the performance theory, the subtle movements we make with our body (the way we cross our arms, the way we sit, the way we walk) and the way we speak (the way we annunciate, the words we use) are the acting techniques we use to characterize ourselves.

In order to emit sureness and thus confidence when walking into an interview, one must always stand straight and tall with shoulders held back. Be sure to walk in a controlled pace, not too fast, not too slow, and, when sitting, there should be absolutely no slouching. Though a very difficult discipline to master, a balletic control of one’s limbs in space is invaluable. After all, there is nothing negative about grace.

In regards to speech, first and foremost always formulate what you want to say in your head before it leaves your mouth. In other words, follow the adage your mother has been drilling into your brain since the time of early childhood: think before you speak. And when you do speak, pronounce the words flawlessly in a commanding but not aggressive. Also, answer the questions being asked with appropriate and to-the-point responses as there is nothing more annoying than beating around the bush.

If followed, these tips could surely lead to a successful interview and, possibly, a new job. If still in doubt, there is always the option of formulating and memorizing a preliminary script, something that all actors do before a performance.