To aid or not to aid: that is the question

The United States is currently facing its biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression. There’s a good chance that you or someone you know has been affected by the rampant unemployment and underemployment, the rising costs of necessities and the general tightening of belts. We need to be helping ourselves and our neighbors in these tough times.


The United States is currently facing its biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression. There’s a good chance that you or someone you know has been affected by the rampant unemployment and underemployment, the rising costs of necessities and the general tightening of belts. We need to be helping ourselves and our neighbors in these tough times.

But we also need to remember that we are part of a larger neighborhood, and no matter the size of the mess in our own backyards, there are people in this world who need our help more than we do right now.

The whole of Japan is in the midst of the largest natural disaster that country has ever faced. An 8.9-magnitude earthquake hit on March 11, causing a tsunami that leveled cities and countryside across the northern half of the island nation.

Also struck were several nuclear power plants. Partial meltdowns have already happened, putting those around the plants in danger of developing radiation sickness. The fallout from a nuclear disaster could affect Japan and surrounding areas for decades.

When something of this magnitude occurs, the task of providing aid falls to those who are able. To sit by ignoring the plight of others is unethical. As college students, we may not have the resources to donate vast amounts of money or time to relief efforts, but that does not give us an excuse for not supporting them however we can.

Give five dollars, help with a fundraiser and encourage others to do the same.  At the very least, help keep the current disaster in Japan and others around the world from fading from our collective consciousness.