What is your motivation?

“How was your test? This is a common question heard on campus and it will be heard more during the coming weeks. No matter what your answer is, the only thing that is going to help prepare you for the next exam is motivation. How motivated are you one week after spring break? Did your week drag by or did it pass as ordinary? Chances are it was difficult to stay focused on reading or be physically and mentally present in your classes.”

How was your test? This is a common question heard on campus and it will be heard more during the coming weeks.

No matter what your answer is, the only thing that is going to help prepare you for the next exam is motivation.

How motivated are you one week after spring break?

Did your week drag by or did it pass as ordinary?

Chances are it was difficult to stay focused on reading or be physically and mentally present in your classes.

According to Duquesne University’s Center for Teaching Excellence, it may be difficult to get back on track.

Returning from spring break is hard for faculty and students.  Whether you used break for fun or work, getting back on track and regaining momentum are essentials for successfully completing the semester. 

Final exams are right around the corner and some are still finishing their midterms, so this is the time to sharpen our motivation and do our best.

Motivation is something that students must initiate.  Fortunately, the initiation is not impervious to outside influence.  Some teachers manage to do something, or be something, that persuades students to read about, talk about, and write about content, and so learn it, educational author Robert Leamnson said.

Motivation is like a bridge that helps us achieve our goals and it needs more care and attention.

Motivational speaker Zig Ziglar said, People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.

Motivate your learning after spring break

1. Assess what you’ve learned up to this point in the semester.

Taking time to examine your performance on finished tests, quizzes, papers and projects can help you understand how to adjust your study for better performance.  Several Web sites offer post-test surveys that can help students determine what went wrong and how to adjust study skills.

2. Practice weekly calendar reviews and updates.

Review your syllabi and calendar Sunday night to be mindful of deadlines and approaching exams or papers.

3. Prioritize assignments.

If you know that a major project is due, plan your time effectively.  Divide large assignments into manageable parts and hold yourself to accomplish each part in a timely way.  Accomplishing manageable goals increases your self-confidence.

4. Develop alternative study places.

As the weather warms, try to find an enjoyable spot outdoors where you can study that is free from distractions. 

5. Get a study partner.

Working with your classmates can get you to refocus on what is important and hold you accountable in the last part of the semester.