A.L.I.C.E Trains Students

“While Akron is one of the pioneer schools to adopt A.L.I.C.E. in Ohio, Otterbien is the other school, a lot of people are left asking, what is this? Alert-Lock-Down-Inform-Counter-Escape is the meaning behind the newest form of survival training available to students.”

While Akron is one of the pioneer schools to adopt A.L.I.C.E. in Ohio, Otterbien is the other school, a lot of people are left asking, what is this?

Alert-Lock-Down-Inform-Counter-Escape is the meaning behind the newest form of survival training available to students.

This program is designed to teach both students and staff how to deal with and survive emergency situations like those of Virginia Tech, Columbine High School and Northern Illinois University.

UAPD Sgt. Chad Cunningham is the programs advocate on Akron’s campus.

He has pushed for both students and faculty to receive training to prepare for these kinds of situations.

While there has not been a student class offered yet, faculty and staff have been working to learn how to survive a shooter situation.

A.L.I.C.E. teaches not only how to prepare for a violent situation but also how to combat the person and increase your chance for survival.

Cunningham started the class with a visualization exercise asking people to imagine themselves in their work or a classroom.

A man walks in and begins to open fire. Your job is to get out safely.

This is to help those mentally prepare themselves for this kind of a situation. The more mentally prepared we are the more ready we are to conquer a situation.

Cunningham then proceeded to teach about each step of the A.L.I.C.E. process.

The largest part of the training is focused on swarming and taking down the perpetrator.

During the hour and 15 minute training session, staff members were instructed to throw books, jackets and water bottles at the shooter in order to keep him from hitting his target.

Moving targets are a lot harder to hit than a standing one, Cunningham said.

He then proceeded to show faculty how to take down the person telling them to control the five appendages, two legs, two arms and a head.

Exactly how has the UA community taken to this revolutionary training?

According to Cunningham, extremely well. The university as a whole has embraced the program, Cunningham said. To give students extra options in case they need it for survival.

As for how this training is going to reach students, Cunningham has a full plan ready.

We have a lot of different strategies, Cunningham said.

There are 12 different instructors on campus who can teach
students how to survive.

Another strategy is going into the classroom.

We are getting into student success seminars. We have about half a dozen of those already on board, Cunningham said.

Also the event, Pizza with the Police, will play host to ALICE training
throughout the year.

However, if you are not taking a class that offers it and are unable to make Pizza with the Police, do not worry. Special classes will be offered.

Cunningham’s goal for the program is to get the word out and prepare both students and staff.

Our hope is once this gets out and people hear about it and understand that a) the fun it is and b) what they get out of it, the take-a-ways, that they are going to want to come and participate in the training.


” #1.1360985:4236843848.jpg:20080825_alice_db-edit.jpg:UA Police Sgt. Chad cunningham instructs ua employees (L to R) Rosie George, Vickie Marina, Kim Roberts and Shelia Carter how to take down a perpetrator.:Diana Ball”