Our View

“The faculty senate will meet today at 3 p.m. to consider a resolution regarding the university’s policy involving DNA testing. The policy was quietly implemented in August, and the faculty senate was never consulted. Though the policy breaks a federal law that becomes effective later this month, it provides the university with the authority to require DNA samples, along with routine background checks, of all prospective employees, including faculty.”

The faculty senate will meet today at 3 p.m. to consider a resolution regarding the university’s policy involving DNA testing.

The policy was quietly implemented in August, and the faculty senate was never consulted. Though the policy breaks a federal law that becomes effective later this month, it provides the university with the authority to require DNA samples, along with routine background checks, of all prospective employees, including faculty.

Despite national media attention and public outcry over the policy, the university’s administration has remained mostly silent, simply defending the policy without elaboration.

This silence isn’t new, and the administration has also remained mute over the ethics conviction of Jack Morrison Jr., a board of trustees member, as they were with the administrative leave of former VP John Case after his DUI. The arrogance of the administration has damaged the university’s integrity and can only strain its negotiations with the Akron-AAUP, which have been underway since July.

At the very least, administrators should have informed the senate about the details of the policy and the rationale behind it. Whether or not individual faculty support the policy, no one should tolerate being left in the dark, especially when it comes to their DNA.

But then again, the administration itself seems to be in the dark when it comes to explaining the policy.

In its meeting today, the senate should take a stand on the DNA issue. Faculty need to communicate clearly to the administration. After all, this policy affects them directly. Blog writers and editorialists can say what they want, but the faculty senate is a group the administration should finally pay attention to.