Our View

“It’s good to be skeptical about things. It’s good to be skeptical about the way our clothes are made, or where our coffee comes from, or if an aspirin a day is really good for us. But some things we can trust. When scientists and medical experts have been producing flu vaccines for 60 years, we can trust them and their vaccine.”

It’s good to be skeptical about things.

It’s good to be skeptical about the way our clothes are made, or where our coffee comes from, or if an aspirin a day is really good for us.

But some things we can trust.

When scientists and medical experts have been producing flu vaccines for 60 years, we can trust them and their vaccine.

There has been fear that the creation and production of the vaccine were rushed.

But when we already have the knowledge and expertise to create flu vaccines, it’s not hard to believe that creating a vaccine for a new strain of the flu could be produced in a few months.

After all, they’re all produced in basically the same way.

Inject the virus into chicken eggs, grow it in large quantities, and then kill it.

When the dead virus is injected into people, it helps their immune systems produce the necessary antibodies.

Even if the production of the vaccine was rushed, this seems like a hard process to mess up.

After all, dead viruses make up the flu vaccines we’ve already received.

If we’re really concerned about the chemicals in the vaccine, such as thimerosal, we can order doses without them.

And the flu, which is dangerous and can certainly be deadly, is probably worth any perceived risk associated with the shot.

If we don’t get it, we’re not only putting ourselves at risk, but also those around us.

It’s clear that getting the vaccine is not only safe, but the socially responsible thing to do as well.