Students discover their “True Colors”

Students+participate+in+the+Power+Plant+Fiasco+activity+at+the+%22True+Colors%22+event.+
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Students discover their “True Colors”

Students participate in the Power Plant Fiasco activity at the

Students participate in the Power Plant Fiasco activity at the "True Colors" event.

Students participate in the Power Plant Fiasco activity at the "True Colors" event.

Students participate in the Power Plant Fiasco activity at the "True Colors" event.

By Zaina Salem, Managing Editor

 

The Department of Student Life hosted a workshop called True Colors: Understanding Yourself, the program explored the different personality temperaments.

On Nov. 15 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Student Union participants were categorized into four central personalities using four different colors: orange, green, blue, and gold.

Each person has a mix of these four personalities, but one is often dominant. By recognizing that everyone has a “true color,” it provides insight into various actions, motivations, and communication approaches.

Those who attended the workshop discovered what color and personality trait they most identified with and learned how it affects leadership style and approach to working with others.

After students found their “true color,” they were broken up into two sessions that put these personalities into action to learn how to collaborate with a variety of people.

In one of these sessions, students participated in an activity called the Power Plant Fiasco in which they were put into a scenario where the lights go out at a nuclear power plant due to lightning which short circuits the system. In order to prevent a nuclear meltdown, students had to work together to override the system.

All participants were blindfolded and given a different colored key, which was also a different object. The goal of the activity was to work together to find which keys were missing in order to override the system. Students had to find a way to effectively communicate with each other in order to get the task done.

After the activity was over, participants were asked how well they felt they did as a group and what they thought they needed to work on. Students also recognized which one among them stepped up and took the lead and how each of their roles matched their True Color.

“I thought it was interesting. It illustrated our strengths and weaknesses. If one person was strong in something, they took the lead and the others followed,” said student Meghan Lee.

After the two breakout sessions, everyone was brought back together to reflect on their experiences. Students were given T-shirts and goody bags with items that symbolized each True Color.

“The main reason students can benefit from this event is that they can get hands-on leadership skills,” said Ashley Rastetter, graduate assistant for the Leadership Program and LeadAkron.

The goals of Leadership Programs within the Department of Student Life are to provide an environment where students can meet new people and to develop their own leadership styles.  Various workshops are held every month and throughout the semester for the entire UA community to benefit from. For more information, visit http://www.uakron.edu/studentlife/lead/.

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