Oneness for prosperity and peace

The keynote speaker at the Global Oneness event will be Ratanjit Sondhe, an entrepreneur, author, and former student of polymer science at UA.

Courtesy of Student 2 Student

The keynote speaker at the Global Oneness event will be Ratanjit Sondhe, an entrepreneur, author, and former student of polymer science at UA.

By Abigail Bashor, acb130@zips.uakron.edu

 

As part of the commemoration of the life of Gandhi, Akron’s Peace Week is a celebration of diversity.

In the spirit of bringing people of all backgrounds closer together, the organization Student 2 Student (S2S) Global Exchange will host a panel discussion titled “Global Oneness: Key To Prosperity and Peace” on Monday Oct. 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Student Union Theater.

The event will feature keynote speaker Ratanjit Sondhe, an entrepreneur, author, and former student of polymer science at UA, who will present his topic: “The Golden Rule of Oneness.”

According to Sondhe, the concept of “oneness” is “the core Truth in which success, prosperity, happiness, and peace and harmony are the intrinsic byproducts once we begin to understand and live it.”

Promoting a strong sense of togetherness, the event provides an opportunity to view people from different ethnic, religious or economic backgrounds in a new way and change their perspective of  diversity in their communities.

Other distinguished panelists include Sudarshan Sathe, Otis Moss Sr., and George Fraser. Each will discuss the applications of oneness in different aspects of life.

The event will also be moderated by R. Ray Gehani, UA business professor and supervisor of S2S Global Exchange.

Gehani started the group in 2012, when he heard one of his students had not eaten for three days because he ran out of money paying tuition and rent.

Inspired by the need to act, Gehani launched S2S with the help of a few students who helped gather food from local restaurants at the end of each Wednesday. Wholesome food that would be otherwise discarded was repackaged into small boxes and distributed to students at Bierce Library for free.
As time passed Gehani expanded his efforts with new students, with the eventual development of the Global Exchange. The program provided a space for face-to-face interactions between international and American students, and has continued to grow ever since.

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