Closing Gitmo not an easy fix for terrorists

“Foreign relations and political correctness have won a decisive battle in their ongoing war against the national security of America. Apologists of the previously stated persuasion are patting themselves on the back for their lobbying and involvement in President Barack Obama’s signing of the executive order to suspend military trial proceedings and ultimately close the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp within a year.”

Foreign relations and political correctness have won a decisive battle in their ongoing war against the national security of America.

Apologists of the previously stated persuasion are patting themselves on the back for their lobbying and involvement in President Barack Obama’s signing of the executive order to suspend military trial proceedings and ultimately close the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp within a year.

It is arguable that since the inception of Guantanamo Bay, no other facility has been more critical in the gathering of counterintelligence and the maintenance of peace and stability in the United States and abroad. Some of the most high profile offenders are detained there currently, such as Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, who faces arraignment on capital charges relating to the al-Qaida on the USS Cole in Yemen that killed 17 U.S. service members and seriously injured 50 others in October of 2000.

However, if President Obama had his way, Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri would have his trial proceeding halted immediately, giving way to the eventual acquittal of all charges because of growing controversy over the adherence to the Geneva Convention rules of war.

Exonerating an individual accused of murdering 17of our nation’s service members? What’s next, dismissing those accused of being involved in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks? Oh, yeah, that is happening as well. If Susan Crawford, the Pentagon official who has the capacity to withdraw charges without reference to a military judge, should decide to go forth with such a notion then trial lawyers representing five suspects involving the Sept. 11 attacks would seek the withdrawal of charges from their clients.

This would be an obviously incredible abomination not only to the memory of those who died unjustly aboard the USS Cole and on Sept.11, but also to the nation as a whole that is still careening emotionally and economically from those days.

What happens when a terrorist suspect at Guantanamo Bay is acquitted and released? Let’s consider freed terrorist Abdallah Salih al-Ajmi. After spending three and a half years in detention at Guantanamo Bay, al-Ajmi was transferred to Kuwait under pressure from the same people who have successfully closed down the prison.

While in Kuwait, al-Ajmi was acquitted of terrorist charges (along with five others) by the Kuwait government that was supposed to watch after him and ensure that he would not pose a threat to anyone.

About two years later, however, innocent al-Ajmi successfully carried out a suicide bomb attack against security forces in Iraq along with two others that killed seven and wounded 28.

Would the politically correct politicians and human rights activists like to explain how releasing this menace to society made the world a safer place?

This is just one instance of what happens when the determination and gut of a nation is undermined by those not willing to take the measures necessary to sufficiently protect it.

It is easy for one to proclaim the alleged atrocities of Guantanamo Bay when this nation has not experienced a major terrorist attack on its soil for almost eight years. The reality is, though, that this nation has enjoyed a period of sustained protection because of the existence of such facilities. Once their existence is jeopardized, however, this nation will be subjected to the full might of the rogue terrorist organizations bolstered by those released from Guantanamo.

Unyielding bravery and certitude in our democratic and peaceful cause must prevail in this dangerous world, and the only way to achieve this effectively is by delivering hard justice where justice is needed.

If this nation elects to acquit suspected terrorists without trial then we will be seeing a significant increase in terrorist activity, as is evident in the previously stated case of the suicide bombing by Abdallah Salih al-Ajmi.

Niccolo Machiavelli summed up this idea best in his 1513 book, The Prince, when he wrote, men avenge light offenses; they cannot avenge severe ones; hence, the harm one does to a man must be such as to obviate any fear of revenge.

It is imperative that this nation’s resolve hold strong. Through trial and due process we must find those responsible for the heinous terrorist acts committed against us and our allies and ultimately deliver justice upon those who warrant it.