Bosma's Breakdown – Favre's legacy will be forever remembered by fans, NFL

“Brett Favre’s retirement came as a shock to the sports community on Tuesday, but the legacy he is leaving behind is what truly matters. For 17 seasons, Favre was always a guy that strayed from the primadonna personality that plagues superstars in the National Football League, and instead, gave fans his true self.”

Brett Favre’s retirement came as a shock to the sports community on Tuesday, but the legacy he is leaving behind is what truly matters.

For 17 seasons, Favre was always a guy that strayed from the primadonna personality that plagues superstars in the National Football League, and instead, gave fans his true self.

He battled addiction publicly, and never shielded an answer or dodged questions about it.

Favre didn’t let his addiction destroy his career. He was able to appeal to football fans by letting his life become an open forum for discussion, knowing that he would be judged not by one situation but by the content of his character.

What Favre was, unlike the majority of sports figures we idolize, was real.

Real to a fault, and real enough that he seemed like a guy we’d like to sit down with, have a beer and talk about life.

Favres’ records, for which he is first in touchdown passes (442), wins (160), completions (5,377), attempts (8,758), passing yards (61,655), consecutive starts (253), Most Valuable Player awards for a QB (3) and interceptions (288), will be outweighed by the memorable plays and games he is leaving behind.

When I think about Brett Favre a year from now, none of his statistics will come to mind.

I’ll remember him running down the field holding his helmet over his head and jumping up and down in Super Bowl XXXI-his only Super Bowl victory.

I’ll remember his unforgettable performance on Monday Night Football less than 24 hours after his father passed away. He threw for four touchdowns in the first half and had 399 passing yards for the game. More so, I’ll remember his quote after the game: I knew that my dad would have wanted me to play. I love him so much and I love this game. It’s meant a great deal to me, to my dad, to my family, and I didn’t expect this kind of performance. But I know he was watching tonight.

I’ll remember the fearless gunslinger that broke so many hearts with untimely interceptions, but always made up for it with plays so spectacular that fans, analysts and players alike were always left speechless.

I’ll remember Favre’s demeanor on the field. He always looked like a child playing pee-wee football-not for the money, but for the love of the game. He was a team player; high-fiving and hugging his offensive lineman and carrying Donald Driver off the field after touchdowns.

I’ll remember the genuine man showing up to press conferences in a dirty hat, wrangler jeans and an old shirt.

I’ll remember Favre’s never say die attitude and willingness to play through pain for the betterment of his team. He was the NFL’s Iron Man, and his retirement comes a year after critics had written him off as washed up and beyond his prime.

Most importantly, I’ll remember the way Favre made me love the game of football more every time I watched him play.

One day, if I have a son that wants to play football, I’ll sit him down and tell him, There’s a right way, and a wrong way to play this game. Play for the love of the game and only if you’re having fun… just like Brett Favre did.

He’ll most likely ask, Who’s Brett Favre?

After a quick smile, I’ll begin to tell him the legend of Brett Favre.

The legend of a man who played the game exactly how it should be played and left everyone who watched him with a great appreciation for his contributions to the game and for the memories that will last forever.

I’ll remember Brett Favre.


” #1.1361210:1509373168.jpg:SPORTS-PANTHERS-PACKERS-7-C.jpg:Favre celebrates after throwing a touchdown.:MCT”