Akron really does C.A.R.E.

“Have you been seeing information in the weekly Zipmail about Akron C.A.R.E.S? Akron C.A.R.E.S. is an organization that works directly with the American Cancer Society. We help raise funds through four different directions that we work in, which are education, advocacy, survivorship, and relay for life, says President of Akron C.”

Have you been seeing information in the weekly Zipmail about Akron C.A.R.E.S? Akron C.A.R.E.S. is an organization that works directly with the American Cancer Society.

We help raise funds through four different directions that we work in, which are education, advocacy, survivorship, and relay for life, says President of Akron C.A.R.E.S., Melanie Schneider. Relay is usually our big event because that is where we bring in the most money.

This is the organization’s third year on campus. The majority of the members in this group are either cancer survivors or those who want to make a difference in someone else’s life.

Akron C.A.R.E.S. is exclusive to Akron, but is also part of Colleges Against Cancer, a subdivision of the American Cancer Society.

Colleges Against Cancer criteria for being an organization sets the standard for how we do things on campus, says Schneider.

Akron C.A.R.E.S. holds several cancer-based awareness weeks, such as breast, lung, and skin cancer, as well as reproductive health.

Recently, the breast cancer week was held. Each day had a different theme upon which the day’s activities were centered.

We have a petition going around asking people not to eat Yoplait Yogurt because one of the ingredients has been linked to Breast Cancer, said Schneider. We have also been selling t-shirts to raise money not only for ourselves, but the American Cancer Society as well.

Akron C.A.R.E.S. also does several relay events throughout the year. Fall Back Into Relay will be held on today from 6:00-8:00 PM. In the spring, team captains will meet to make sure everybody is on the same page.

The majority of their advocacy pieces serve to make lawmakers aware that cancer should be the number-one priority for those who live in Ohio.

Last year, for their survivorship activities, Akron C.A.R.E.S. went to Hope Lodge, located near Cleveland, and played bingo with the patients and their families for two hours.

We try and pick cancers that we feel directly affect college students the most, says Schneider. She believes that the organization’s main goal is to educate students about cancer.

We obviously want to honor the survivors here on campus. It is difficult being at this age, between 19-25 where people don’t want to talk about it, but we want them to know that we honor them, that we stand up for them, and that we’re fighting for them.

It is also important to note that you do not have to be part of Akron C.A.R.E.S. in order to contribute.

At the Making Strides walk this past Sunday, over 5,000 people-including community members, family members, and students-walked to show their support.

Schneider does not believe that lots of people know about this group because they are still relatively new, although they have reached their goal of 50 members this year. They do advertise through Zipmail, and are trying to do more advertising through flyers.
Schneider believes that Akron C.A.R.E.S in an important group because cancer affects a lot of people’s lives and it’s number two on the list of causes of death.

Even if a small group of people can make difference, I am glad that people who joined the group are helping to make that difference.

This group chooses to deal with cancer because it affects many college students, and many people remain unaware.