Part-time faculty skipped over in year-end bonus

” The University of Akron’ s offer of a 2 percent, one-time payment came as an early Christmas present for UA employees, but some who were excluded from the offer woke up to an unpadded bank account Dec. 25. President Proenza’s Dec. 16 e-mail promised all employees a one-time payment equal to 2 percent of their current base salary.”

The University of Akron’ s offer of a 2 percent, one-time payment came as an early Christmas present for UA employees, but some who were excluded from the offer woke up to an unpadded bank account Dec. 25.

President Proenza’s Dec. 16 e-mail promised all employees a one-time payment equal to 2 percent of their current base salary. All non-union employees were to receive the payment before the Jan. 1 and union employees would vote on whether or not to receive the bonus. The AAUP voted to reject the payment because of on-going contract negotiations.

Despite the AAUP’s rejection of the offer, all non-union employees, including part-time and temporary employees, still expected the payment to reach their account before the New Year.

Two days after his initial e-mail, Proenza set another internal memo to all employees which the president’s office called a retraction of the first e-mail. In the second paragraph Proenza wrote the University’s Board of Trustees authorized my recommendation to grant most full-time employees a one-time payment.

When asked about the one-time payment Laura Massie, Director of Media Relations for the university, said, There is no update. It happened.

Massie said that the possibility of payment to part-time employees is still being determined.

The rewording of the offer signaled what many employees were finding out for themselves as they contacted payroll and department heads: the offer excluded part-time and temporary employees and those hired after July. The Fraternal Order of Police was also excluded due to their previous negotiations.

The failure to receive the bonus angered many part-time employees especially instructors who compose 60 percent of classroom employees, the highest percentage in the state, and typically earn $600-$1,000 per credit hour.

I’ve talked to two lawyers about it. They said we should file a claim, said Heather Pollock, an instructor in the classics department.

Pollock and other adjunct faculty said the university offered the payment as a carrot in the negotiations with the AAUP. She added that the individually addressed e-mail was sent to all employees.

To Pollock and many part-time employees the failure to receive the payment, or be clearly contacted and informed that the payment did not apply to them, is just another way part-timers feel under-appreciated by the university.

We feel, Pollock said, like we’re treated like second-class citizens.July. The Fraternal Order of Police was also excluded due to their previous negotiations.

The failure to receive the bonus angered many part-time employees especially instructors who compose 60 percent of classroom employees, the highest percentage in the state, and typically earn $600-$1,000 per credit hour.

I’ve talked to two lawyers about it. They said we should file a claim, said Heather Pollock, an instructor in the classics department.

Pollock and other adjunct faculty said the university offered the payment as a carrot in the negotiations with the AAUP. She added that the individually addressed e-mail was sent to all employees.

To Pollock and many part-time employees the failure to receive the payment, or be clearly contacted and informed that the payment did not apply to them, is just another way part-timers feel under-appreciated by the university.

We feel, Pollock said, like we’re treated like second-class citizens.