Effective instructors: a matter of perspective

Teaching styles vary depending on the professor, the subject matter, the class size and the objective of the course. There’s no right or wrong way to teach a course, only a curriculum guide the professors must follow.


Teaching styles vary depending on the professor, the subject matter, the class size and the objective of the course. There’s no right or wrong way to teach a course, only a curriculum guide the professors must follow.

Professors are individuals with their own styles. One does not become a professor by not knowing how to teach a course or without a firm grasp of the material. Not all students will agree with the way a class is taught, but it isn’t really up to the student.

If every class were structured and taught in the exact same manner, how boring would that be? Incredibly! I have experienced a variety of professors, some with rather strange teaching habits, and I have benefited from all of them.

Maybe a student shouldn’t have to teach his or her own class, but at the same time, consider what it teaches the students. It’s a different approach that shows the student how much goes into educating others while educating themselves. Depending on the course material, the students’ teaching is most likely more exciting than listening to the same guy stand up and babble on for hours. It’s all a matter of perspective.

Complaining about the style of teaching is pointless. It’s not the style that matters; it’s what one does with the information being presented. No matter how the professor handles the class, it’s about taking personal initiative to learn in a way that suits one’s learning habits.

The majority of the classes required at the University are pointless and the majority of the professors are so well-versed in their subject that they are horrible at their jobs. It’s a matter of opinion. If the University did not require so many useless classes for a degree, students would be in and out so fast that no one would make money, and that’s that.

Some of the best classes I have had are those where the professor has abandoned traditional teaching. Redundancy bores me. I like to have fun with my education. When a professor shows the same kind of enthusiasm through quirk, student-led discussions, teaching projects, group assignments, storytelling or anything different from the educational tradition, I have more fun. I learn more and am genuinely excited to be educated.

No matter how much a student pays or how much he or she complains, chances are, nothing will change. These professors and their classes would not be structured as such if students did not learn at all. There’s no way the University could appease every student, professor, class or any other issue someone might conceive.

I don’t agree with the foreign language requirement. I don’t believe I should have to suffer through four semesters. I’m an English major. I want to write, not talk, and more than that, I’m going to do it all in English. I think the structure of the course is horrendous and each day as I walk to class I am filled with anxiety and hatred, but I show up. Every single class. I may not learn as much as I should from the professor or the class, but that’s when I step up and teach myself. Sure, for what we’re paying we shouldn’t have to teach ourselves, but it happens. It’s part of the way the system works.

College is designed to enhance a student’s knowledge of his or her career path while also enlarging his or her spectrum of knowledge in courses outside of the major. Your classes may not be perfect, but that’s no excuse for you not to make the most of your education. Complaining only gets you so far, and in the real world, your boss probably won’t care if you don’t like his or her managing skills, either.

Complaining just makes you bitter. Be proactive, and if that doesn’t work, make the most of what you do have because life really isn’t fair. That’s a fact.