Ford pleads guilty to UA threat

“In the beginning of the 2007 Fall semester at the University of Akron the campus was alarmed by multiple bomb threats, including the threat that closed Kolbe Hall on Aug 30. Jason D. Ford, 27, of Akron was the only suspect arrested for the threats. Ford has recently pled guilty, just days before his pre-trial was to occur.”

In the beginning of the 2007 Fall semester at the University of Akron the campus was alarmed by multiple bomb threats, including the threat that closed Kolbe Hall on Aug 30.

Jason D. Ford, 27, of Akron was the only suspect arrested for the threats.

Ford has recently pled guilty, just days before his pre-trial was to occur.

He was given a year of prison, John Greven, his lawyer said. However, the judge changed his sentence to two years of probation, and he was ordered to receive counseling.

Summit County Common Pleas Judge Elinore Marsh Stormer additionally dismissed a charge of inducing panic and ordered that Ford reside with his mother.

According to Summit County Prosecutor Public Relations Representative Laurie Crammer, Ford was found to be competent through a competency review.

Ford was found to have a very low IQ, she explained. This was most likely taken into consideration.

There was no basic strategy, Greven said regarding the court case. Ford didn’t have any intent to hurt anyone, and he didn’t think his actions would cause as much disruption or panic as they did.

UA students had their own view of the court case.

I think that his prison sentence should not have been taken away, Michael Cohen, a senior said. I feel that if someone is willing to commit a crime, they should accept the consequences that accompany their decision.

Junior Megan McCormick also had her own thoughts. I hope that Mr. Ford receives the help that he needs in counseling, she said. The bomb threats were very disruptive for both professors and students, and left many people feeling too uncomfortable to continue their normal activities.

According to UA Senior Public Relations Representative Ken Torisky, the other cases dealing with bomb threats are still being investigated.

Not only are the cases being investigated locally, but they are also being investigated federally, Torisky said.