Our View: The ugly face of stereotypes- it sees you

What question is too difficult to answer? Are there some topics that just shouldn’t be discussed because some people might hear our responses and think differently of us?  This is ridiculous.  As students of higher education, we should not only be willing to think about the difficult questions, but we should also embrace them. We should be beginning to form solid stances on our beliefs.  College is the time during which we begin to truly figure out what kind of adults we will be, and so it is bizarre that students do not want to take a stance on a question that concerns everyone on this campus.


What question is too difficult to answer? Are there some topics that just shouldn’t be discussed because some people might hear our responses and think differently of us?  This is ridiculous.  As students of higher education, we should not only be willing to think about the difficult questions, but we should also embrace them. We should be beginning to form solid stances on our beliefs.  College is the time during which we begin to truly figure out what kind of adults we will be, and so it is bizarre that students do not want to take a stance on a question that concerns everyone on this campus.

This week, we attempted to ask students their opinions concerning stereotypes that they commonly think of on the average day walking around campus.  In an interesting turn, many students were reluctant to answer questions related to this topic. 

To begin with, we must first acknowledge that stereotypes exist in our society.  Claiming that stereotypical forces don’t have an impact on us is naive.  As with any major issue in society, the recognition of it as a truth is imperative, but many prefer to live in denial.  People like to pretend that by not acknowledging the existence of something, it loses its social meaning.  This is plain ignorance and does not help anyone in any way whatsoever.  In truth, stereotypes permeate every level of society and impact us all every day. However, by recognizing the impact that they have, we can work to evolve past them. 

In order to correct the social injustices that stereotyping engenders, we must first be able to talk about the issue. No subject should ever be taboo at an institute of higher learning, especially one of such importance. Just because you ignore something or deny its existence doesn’t mean that it goes away. In fact, denial and ignorance can often exacerbate a problem. As the future leaders of America, what change do we expect to make in the world if we can’t even