Super Tuesday not so super

“The results are in…the new presidential candidates for the 2008 Presidential Election, respectively, are… No one. Super Tuesday perhaps wasn’t so super. Where are all the results, all the commentaries pointing towards specific candidates? The truth is, they don’t exist.”

The results are in…the new presidential candidates for the 2008 Presidential Election, respectively, are…

No one.

Super Tuesday perhaps wasn’t so super. Where are all the results, all the commentaries pointing towards specific candidates?

The truth is, they don’t exist. While John McCain pulled far ahead of his fellow Republicans Mitt Romney and Mike Huckabee, there is still a decent chance that he won’t get the Republican nomination. The Democratic results with Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, are definitely too close to call. USA Today said that they both had bragging rights-that is, they both had good wins. While Hillary did end up taking California, which no one stayed up to watch, Obama took Georgia and Illinois.

As the Ohio primaries approach, the candidates will begin to feel more pressure to stand out from the rest. Hillary, for example, is trying to secure the women’s vote, Obama wants the black vote and Huckabee has the Christian vote. But no one, interestingly enough, has made more than a small effort to bring in the youth vote.

McCain should be campaigning hard for the 18-24 crowd. He’ll need your undying loyalty when he drafts you in two years.

I overheard a conversation in class today. I’m voting for Giovanni, one guy said.

Yeah? I didn’t even know he was running, the other said.

They both figured out, eventually, that Rudy Giuliani had dropped out of the race awhile ago, and that they could not, unfortunately, vote for him.

Although it may be apathy that keeps America’s youth from being more politically informed, candidates should be considered partially responsible for not reaching out more. Perhaps the candidate who focuses more on America’s youth will be the one to stand out among other party members and seal their name, not only on the November 2008 ballot, but in history.